10th European BSD Conference: Oct 6-9 2011, Maarssen, The Netherlands

EuroBSDcon 2011 Tutorials

Schedule

Thursday - October 6th 2011

Time Track 1 Track 2
09:00-10:00 Registration, coffee, sandwiches
Full Day
10:00-13:15
14:00-17:15
An Introduction to the FreeBSD Open-Source Operating System:
Kernel Functions
by Kirk McKusick
pfSense 2.0 Tutorial
by Chris Buechler and Ermal Luši

Friday - October 7th 2011

Time Track 1 Track 2 Track 3
09:00-10:00 Registration, coffee, sandwiches
Morning
10:00-13:15
An Introduction to the FreeBSD Open-Source Operating System:
Filesystems and Networking
by Kirk McKusick
Building the network you need with PF,the OpenBSD packet filter
by Peter Hansteen
Dtrace
by Tod McQuillin
Afternoon
14:00-17:15
An Introduction to the FreeBSD Open-Source Operating System (continued):
Filesystems and Networking
by Kirk McKusick
Building the network you need with PF,the OpenBSD packet filter (continued)
by Peter Hansteen
Introduction to NETGRAPH on FreeBSD systems
by Adrian Steinmann

pfSense 2.0 Tutorial by Chris Buechler, Ermal Luši

Abstract
At the time of EuroBSDcon 2011, pfSense 2.0 will be released, with development well under way on 2.1. This tutorial will be a training-focused session, covering many of the changes in the 2.0 release, both from the perspective of a new user and providing information on changes for existing users of the project. Common usage scenarios, deployment considerations, step by step configuration guidance, and best practices will be covered for many features. Many configurations will be demonstrated in a live lab environment. We will also cover the new functionality in pfSense 2.1, which is already being used in production for its IPv6 capabilities.

Attendees are assumed to have basic knowledge of TCP/IP and firewalling concepts, however no in-depth knowledge in these areas or prior knowledge of pfSense or FreeBSD is necessary.
About the author
Chris Buechler is the co-founder of the pfSense open source firewall distribution, and co-founder and Chief Technology Officer of BSD Perimeter LLC, the corporate arm of pfSense, where he works with clients on a wide range of networking and security-related needs. Chris has more than a decade of IT experience and holds numerous industry certifications including the CISSP, SSCP, MCSE and CCNA amongst others. He is the primary author of pfSense: The Definitive Guide from Reed Media, one of the top selling security books since its release, and served as the contributing author on security for the book SharePoint 2007: The Definitive Guide from O'Reilly. He has presented on security and networking topics at 15 conferences in the US, Canada and Europe.

Ermal Luši is one of the core pfSense developers, and also a FreeBSD source committer. He makes a living working on pfSense. He earned a Bachelor's Degree and a Master of Science in Computer Science from University of Tirana, Tirane, Albania. If not busy with working on pfSense he does work on FreeBSD and consulting. In his spare time he enjoys traveling and exploring other cultures.


Building the network you need with PF, the OpenBSD packet filter by Peter N. M. Hansteen

Abstract
This one day session is aimed at experienced or aspiring network administrators who want to expand their knowledge of PF, the OpenBSD packet filter, and related tools. A basic knowledge of Unix and TCP/IP network configuration is expected and required. Topics covered include The session will provide updates on the new PF syntax and features introduced in OpenBSD 4.7 (with samples presented in the old and new syntax where appropriate), with newer updates and reviews of relevant new features in the upcoming OpenBSD 5.0 release. The tutorial is loosely based on Hansteen's book, The Book of PF (No Starch Press, second edition November 2010).
About the author
Peter N. M. Hansteen is a consultant, writer and sysadmin from Bergen, Norway. A longtime freenix advocate and during recent years a frequent lecturer and tutor with emphasis on OpenBSD and FreeBSD, author of several articles and The Book of PF (No Starch Press 2007, 2nd edition November 2010). He writes an occasionally slashdotted blog at bsdly.blogspot.com


An Introduction to the FreeBSD Open-Source Operating System by Marshall Kirk McKusick

Abstract
This course will provide a firm background in the FreeBSD kernel. The course will begin with a description of how the filesystem buffers are managed. The implementation of the filesystem and its capabilities including soft updates and snapshots will be described. The filesystem interface will then be generalized to show how to support multiple filesystem types. The course will also cover the FreeBSD socket-based network architecture, layering and implementation. The socket communications primitives and internal layering will be discussed, with emphasis on the interfaces between the layers. A discussion of routing issues will be included. The presentations will emphasize code organization, data structure navigation, and algorithms. It will not cover the machine specific parts of the system such as device drivers.

The course is divided in two days, together they cover the entire FreeBSD kernel but subjects have been arranged such that students can also decide to attend only the first or the second day depending on the subjects they are interested in.

Day 1 - Kernel Functions

Morning - Kernel Overview Afternoon - Kernel I/O structure

Day 2 - Filesystems and Networking

Morning - Filesystem Overview Afternoon - Networking Implementation
About the author
Dr. Marshall Kirk McKusick writes books and articles, consults, and teaches classes on UNIX- and BSD-related subjects. For the past ten years he has been a developer and commiter to the FreeBSD Project. His particular areas of interest are the virtual-memory system and the filesystem. While at the University of California at Berkeley, he implemented the 4.2BSD fast file system, and was the Research Computer Scientist at the Berkeley Computer Systems Research Group (CSRG) overseeing the development and release of 4.3BSD and 4.4BSD. He earned his undergraduate degree in Electrical Engineering from Cornell University, and did his graduate work at the University of California at Berkeley, where he received Masters degrees in Computer Science and Business Administration, and a doctoral degree in Computer Science. He is a past president of the Usenix Association, is on the editorial board of ACM's Queue magazine, and is a member of ACM and IEEE.


DTrace on FreeBSD systems: Hands on workshop by Tod McQuillin

Abstract
DTrace is a powerful tool for analyzing system performance on production systems in real time, originally developed by Sun Microsystems for the Solaris operating system. Since the initial port of DTrace to FreeBSD in 2006, DTrace support on FreeBSD has grown more and more mature, and recently in 2011, userland DTrace support has also been added to FreeBSD.

DTrace support on FreeBSD is still new and is not yet as mature as it is on Solaris, but it is still useful enough to provide a powerful new tool for system observability and problem diagnosis.

The tutorial aims to help students become proficient with the use of DTrace on FreeBSD systems to analyze and correct system performance problems.

The tutorial will covers DTrace in detail, including enabling DTrace on FreeBSD and FreeBSD specific DTrace features, the D programming language, and includes several hands-on exercises in which students can participate during the session.
About the author
Tod McQuillin co-founded Telerama, one of the United States's first public access Internet service providers, in 1991. Tod joined UBS in 1995 and has worked in various IT groups in UBS including system administration, source code administration and developer services, performance metrics engineering and software development, and automated software build frameworks.

He has been working with BSD Unix since 1988, FreeBSD since 1993 and Solaris since 1995.

After moving to Japan in 1996, Tod has learned to read and write Japanese, Perl, C, and SQL to a high proficiency. He's also a fine cook. Tod will celebrate his 22nd wedding anniversary in October.


Introduction to NETGRAPH on FreeBSD systems by Adrian Steinmann

Abstract
FreeBSDs NETGRAPH infrastructure can be understood as customizable network plumbing. Its flexibility and the fact that this infrastructure runs in the kernel makes it an attractive enabling technology where time-to-market, agility, and performance are important.

The goal of the tutorial is to become familiar with FreeBSDs NETGRAPH framework and the available NETGRAPH kernel modules. The participants will gain insight and understanding for which projects lend themselves well to NETGRAPH solutions. A number of examples are shown which can be used as a starting point for new NETGRAPH projects. In the first part of the tutorial, the NETGRAPH nodes, hooks, and control messages are described and the command syntax is explained via demonstrations on simple examples. Participants learn how they can describe a network connection in terms of its underlying protocols and how to express a solution using NETGRAPH terminology.

The second part of the tutorial investigates frequently used NETGRAPH nodes and shows how they interconnect to create network protocols. More complex NETGRAPH examples including VLAN bridges, UDP tunnels, and the Multi-link Point-to-Point daemon are described. Guidelines and resources for developing custom NETGRAPH modules are surveyed.
About the author
Adrian Steinmann earned a Ph.D. in Mathematical Physics from Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich, Switzerland, and has over 20 years experience as an IT consultant and software developer. He is founder of Webgroup Consulting AG, a Swiss consulting company.

He has been working with FreeBSD since 1993 and NetBSD since 2005. He develops and maintains the STYX system to offer FreeBSD remote managed firewall services and to build custom systems on small x86 based platforms. This enabling technology has also been used to build secure encryption appliances on commodity hardware for the Swiss IT industry.

He is fluent in Perl, C, English, German, Italian, and has passion and flair for finding straightforward solutions to intricate problems.

During his free time he likes to play Go, to hike, and to sculpt.

Location

Meeting Plaza Maarssen
Planetenbaan 100
3606 AK Maarssen
The Netherlands